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Date of Release: January 2, 2014

Small Progress Throughout Collegiate Athletic Leadership: Assessing Diversity among Campus and Conference Leaders for Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Schools in the 2013-14 Academic Year

Orlando, FL … January 2, 2014 – The key leadership positions at Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) schools and conferences remain overwhelmingly white and male according to a new study released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida. This year’s report showed slight increases in the percentage of women and people of color in campus leadership positions. The largest increase in people of color was in the Athletics Director position, which increased by 2.7 percentage points from 12.5 percent in 2012 to 15.2 percent in 2013 while people of color holding Faculty Athletics Representative and President positions increased by 0.5 and 1.2 percentage points, respectively. FBS head football coach was the one significant position that showed an increase in the percentage of whites.

TIDES released Small Progress Throughout Collegiate Athletic Leadership:: Assessing Diversity among Campus and Conference Leaders for Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Schools in the 2013-14 Academic Year. This is a study that examines the race and gender of conference commissioners and campus leaders, including college and university presidents, athletics directors and faculty athletics representatives for all 125 FBS institutions. The study also includes head football coaches, assistant coaches and student-athletes for the football teams. Finally, the faculty as a whole is examined.

Richard Lapchick, director of TIDES and principal author of the report, said, “The fact is that 88.8 percent of our presidents are white, 84.8 percent of our athletics directors are white, and 100 percent of our conference commissioners are white. In those positions, 75.2, 78.4, and 100 percent are white men, respectively. Overall, whites held 341 (89.3 percent) of the 382 campus leadership positions reported in this study, which is a decrease from 90.7 percent. These disproportionately white percentages do not reflect who is playing on college sport teams or the America that we know.

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Date of Release: December 9, 2013
Keeping Score When It Counts: Assessing the Academic Records of the 2013-2014 Bowl-Bound College Football Teams

The overall academic progress of college football student-­‐ athletes continued while the substantial gap between white and African-­‐American football student-­‐athletes remained large for the 70 Football Bowl Subdivision
(FBS) eligible schools. The results were reported in “Keeping Score When It Counts: Assessing the Academic Records of the 2013-­‐2014 Bowl-­‐bound College Football Teams,” a study released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida.

Richard Lapchick, director of TIDES and the primary author of the study, said, “The academic success of FBS football student-­‐athletes continued to grow this year. The overall football student-­‐athlete Graduation Success Rate (GSR) for bowl-­‐bound teams improved from 69 to 72 percent.”

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Date of Release: November 21nd, 2013
The 2013 Racial and Gender Report Card: MLS

The overall grade for Major League Soccer (MLS) rose slightly for racial and gender hiring practices while the grade dropped slightly for racial hiring practices and rose for gender hiring practices in the 2013 MLS Racial and Gender Report Card (RGRC). The MLS RGRC was issued by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida. MLS earned a B+ grade on its racial hiring practices in the 2013 MLS RGRC with 87.3 points, down from 88.6 points in the 2012 MLS RGRC. MLS’s grade for gender hiring practices remained a B with 83.5 points, up a significant three percentage points from 80.5 in 2012.

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Date of Release: October 22nd, 2013
The 2013 Racial and Gender Report Card: NFL

The National Football League achieved its fourth consecutive A for racial hiring practices and a C+ for gender hiring practices in the 2013 NFL Racial and Gender Report Card, released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida (UCF). This gave the NFL a combined B grade.

The NFL’s score for both race and gender was 90 percent and 74.5 percent, respectively, for the second year in a row. The overall grade for the NFL remained at 82.3 percent.

Richard Lapchick, Director of TIDES and the primary author of the study, said “the initiatives of Commissioner Roger Goodell and Executive Vice President for Human Resources and Chief Diversity Officer, Robert Gulliver, have been paying large dividends for the NFL. At the league office, the example is being set for the teams by continuing to make improvements in the hiring of women and people of color in senior positions. Due to hiring and promotions, the total number of diverse employees at or above the VP level increased by 11 percent in 2013. The number of women at or above the VP level increased by 18 percent, in 2013. The number of ethnically diverse employees at or above the VP level increased by eight percent in 2013.

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Date of Release: October 9th, 2013
The 2013 Racial and Gender Report Card: WNBA

The WNBA received a combined grade of an A+ for race and gender after earning an A+ for race and an A+ for gender in the 2013 WNBA Racial and Gender Report Card. The 96 points accumulated for the combined grade ties their own record set in the 2012 WNBA RGRC when they also received a combined A+.

In the 2001, 2004, 2005, 2006-­-07, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and now 2013 Racial and Gender Report Cards, the WNBA has received at least A’s for their overall race, gender and combined grades. The WNBA has regularly been the industry leader for all professional sport when it comes to diversity and inclusion.

Richard Lapchick, the director of TIDES and primary author of the report, said, “The WNBA continues to set the standard for racial and gender diversity amongst all professional leagues. Laurel J. Richie, the first woman of color to become president of a professional sports league, continued the WNBA’s proud tradition as professional sports’ most diverse organization. Receiving the highest combined grade in the history of the Racial and Gender Report Cards for two years in a row is outstanding. As it has had before, the WNBA once again had the highest number of A’s as well as the lowest number of grades below an A in all categories compared to the other professional leagues. The NBA is the only men’s league that is even close with an A+ for Racial Hiring Practices and a B+ for gender hiring practices.”

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Date of Release: July 10th, 2013
The 2012 Racial and Gender Report Card: College Sport

The 2012 College Sport Racial and Gender Report Card (CRGRC), issued today by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida (UCF), showed that NCAA member institutions earned the same grades for 2012 as they did in the 2011 report. They received B’s for both racial and gender hiring practices. College Sport received a B as the combined grade.

Richard Lapchick, the Director of TIDES at UCF and the primary author of the CRGRC, said, “While it is good that the colleges and universities have B’s in all three categories, it is discouraging that the grade for race decreased slightly from 82.2 in 2011 to 81 points. Among all the college and pro sports covered by the respective Racial and Gender Report Cards, college sport has the lowest grade for racial hiring practices and is only better for gender hiring practices than the NFL and Major League Baseball.

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Date of Release: June 25th, 2013
The 2013 Racial and Gender Report Card: National Basketball Association

Richard Lapchick, the director of TIDES and primary author of the report, stated, “that the NBA remains the industry leader among the men’s sports for racial and gender hiring practices. No one else reaches the same points for race, gender or the combined score.”

In the NBA league office, 35.7 percent of all professional employees are people of color and 41.1 percent are women. The League Office also had 44 women serving as vice presidents in the 2012-2013 season. “When David Stern steps down as NBA Commissioner in 2014, among the legacies he will have created is an era in professional sport when leagues and teams hired the best people possible. He embraced the moral imperative for diversity while helping to show the other leagues that diversity is also a business imperative. The evidence for the NBA’s continued commitment to racial equality is seen in the strong grades in the League Office and in many key areas on the team level. Nearly 47 percent of all head coaches were coaches of color, the second highest percentage in NBA history. The NBA set a new record for assistant coaches of color at 45.6 percent. The percentage of people of color who held team professional administration positions increased by 3.1 percentage points to 27.6 percent, the highest percentage since the 2008-09 season. However, there were notable declines for women at the team level in senior and professional administrative roles with drops of 4.3 and 4 percent, respectively.”

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Date of Release: May 21st, 2013
The 2013 Racial and Gender Report Card: Major League Baseball

Dr. Richard Lapchick, the primary author of the study and the director of The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES or the Institute) at the University of Central Florida (UCF) said, “As he nears retirement, one of the legacies of Commissioner Bud Selig is that he recognized the need for diversity in baseball long ago. MLB continues to make real progress in the areas of inclusion and diversity. He placed the responsibility under Wendy Lewis, Sr. Vice President for Diversity and Strategic Alliances, and she has helped the Commissioner deliver on his promise.”

Lapchick noted that, “The release of the movie “42” about the life of Jackie Robinson helped increase focus as the 2013 MLB season began. Jackie Robinson wanted to see a diverse mixture of people participating in the sport through all levels: on the field as coaches and players, as well as those in the front office. As has been the case for several years, the percentage of African-­-American baseball players in MLB remained low at a distressing 8.3 percent. At the League Office, there were very good grades for hiring people of color (A+) and women (B+/A-­-) although the percentages for both declined slightly for the third consecutive year. However, at the team level, which has historically been far behind the League Office, all grades for race and gender improved slightly except for women in team professional positions. The front office of the teams should continue to make an effort to create a work force that mirrors America.”

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Date of Release: March 27th, 2013
Keeping Score When It Counts: Analyzing the Academic Performance of the 2013 NCAA Division I Women’s and Men’s Sweet 16 Teams

This study is a follow-­-up report to the annual study, “Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2013 NCAA Division I Women’s and Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams,” which compares the GSR and APR for teams that were selected for the men’s and women’s basketball tournaments.

Dr. Lapchick, the study's primary author, commented that, “There is good news regarding academic success in general for both the men’s and women’s Sweet 16 teams. The GSR and the APR rates of the teams are overwhelmingly high. As in the past, the women still do better than the men and the persistent gap between the graduation rates of white and African-­-American student-­-athletes remains too large for some of the men’s teams.”

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Date of Release: March 19th, 2013
Keeping Score When It Counts: Academic Progress/Graduation Success Rate Study of 2013 NCAA Division I Women’s and Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams

This study is a follow-up report to the men’s tournament study that was released on March 18, 2013. (http://www.tidesport.org/Grad%20Rates/2013%20Men's%20Basketball%20Tournament%20Teams%20Study.p df). The study compares the academic performance of male and female basketball student-athletes and of African-American and white basketball student-athletes by examining the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) and the Academic Progress Rates (APR) for the tournament teams. The women graduated at a rate of 90 percent vs. 70 percent for the men. The women also had only one team in the tournament with an APR below a 925 compared to the men who had three teams.

Lapchick stated, “The women’s teams always give us good news to report each year. It has historically been clear that student-athletes on women’s basketball teams graduate at a higher rate than student-athletes on men’s basketball teams. Additionally, the disparity gap between white and African-American student-athletes has always been significantly smaller on women’s teams compared to men’s teams. This year’s study reveals that there has been a two percentage point decrease in the disparity between graduation rates of white and African-American women student-athletes resulting in six percentage point gap compared to a 25 percentage point gap for the men’s teams.”

There are 25 women’s teams that have a 100 percent graduation rate in the 2013 field. All of the women’s teams graduated more than 60 percent of their student-athletes except Hampton University.

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Date of Release: March 18th, 2013
Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2013 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams

The study examines the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) and Academic Progress Rates (APR) for tournament teams as reported by the NCAA. This study also compares the graduation rate data of white and African-American male basketball student-athletes.

Richard Lapchick, the Director of the Institute and primary author of this report, said, “There is good news to report in almost every category examined. First, there was improvement in the graduation rates for 2013. The overall GSR for male basketball student-athletes increased in 2013 to 70 percent from 67 percent in 2012. The GSR numbers for white male basketball student-athletes increased slightly from 88 percent in 2012 to 90 percent in 2013. The GSR for African-American male basketball student-athletes increased substantially by six percentage points from 59 percent in 2012 to 65 percent in 2013.

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Date of Release: March 11th, 2013
The 2012 Associated Press Sports Editors Racial and Gender Report Card

For 2012, the grade for racial hiring practices for APSE newspapers and websites remained at a C+, the same grade issued in the 2010 Study. The grade issued for gender hiring practices remained constant as well, recording the third consecutive F for gender hiring practices. The APSE newspapers have received a failing grade for gender since TIDES began issuing grades in the 2008 Report Card. Grades were not issued for the 2006 Report Card. The combined grade for 2012 was a D+.

Richard Lapchick, the Director of the Institute and primary author of this report, noted, “After six years from the 2006 Report to the 2012 report, there was some change in the five key positions we examined for race but little for gender. In spite of the small improvement for race, the overall grade for racial hiring practices remained a C+, the same as it was in 2010.

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Date of Release: January 25th, 2013
The 2011 Complete Racial and Gender Report Card

The 2011 Racial and Gender Report Card marked the third consecutive Report
in which the five professional leagues received A’s for race. The NFL and MLS
were the only leagues that received a grade lower than a B- for gender hiring
practices.

The NBA and WNBA continued to set the industry standard for professional
sports leagues. Both received a combined grade of an A for race and gender.
College sport did not receive a grade due to the reasons specified below.
Our sports teams play the best athletes to win games. The Institute for
Diversity and Ethics in Sport emphasizes that diversity is a business imperative
for sports organizations not only when they choose their team on the field
but also in their front offices. We also emphasize that adopting more inclusive
hiring practices alone is not sufficient. Diversity initiatives like diversity
management training can help change the office climate along with attitudes
while increasing the applicant pool for open positions.

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Date of Release: December 3, 2012
Keeping Score When It Counts:
Assessing the 2012-2013 Bowl-bound College Football Teams’ Graduation Rates

Overall academic progress continued while the substantial gap between white and African-American football student-athletes remains the same from last year for the 70 Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) schools (formerly known as Division I-A schools) playing in this year’s college football bowl games. The results were reported in a study released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida.

Richard Lapchick, director of TIDES and the primary author of the study, said, “The academic success of FBS football student-athletes continued to grow this year. The overall football student-athlete Graduation Success Rate (GSR) for bowl-bound teams improved from 68 percent to 69 percent. “

“This year, 96 percent of the schools (67 of the 70) had at least a 50 percent Graduation Success Rate for their football teams, which decreased from 97 percent in the 2011 study. In addition, 97 percent of the schools (68 of the 70) received a score higher than 925 on the NCAA’s Academic Progress Rate (APR), which decreased from 99 percent last year. In spite of the decreases, the figures for both the GSR and APR were high.”

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Date of Release: November 29, 2012
The 2012 BCA Hiring Report Card for NCAA FBS and FCS Football Head Coaching Positions

Between 1982 and 2011, there have been 546 head football coach openings at FBS schools. In those 29 years, a total of 50 African-Americans (9.2 percent) were hired. As recently as 2007, there were only five coaches of color at FBS schools.

There were 18 coaches of color who were head coaches at FBS schools in the 2012 season including three African-Americans and a Polynesian who were hired for the 2012 season. Kevin Sumlin was hired by Texas A&M. He had been at the University of Houston as head coach in 2011.

There are nine coaches of color at the FCS schools in 2012. Thus, there were 27 coaches of color, one less than last year’s record of 28 coaches at FBS and FCS schools.
There were a total of 39 head coach placements in 2012 which was the highest number since the report was started in 2004. This was four higher than the previous high of 35 in 2007.

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Date of Release: November 28, 2012
Assessing Diversity among Campus and Conference Leaders for Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Schools in the 2012-2013 Academic Year

The key leadership positions at Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) schools and conferences remain overwhelmingly white and male showing mixed progress across positions according to a new study released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida. This year’s report showed a decline in the percentage of women in campus leadership positions with a slight increase in the representation of people of color, especially for Latinos and Asians. Overall, most of the leadership positions remained the same or had close to a one-­‐ percentage point increase for people of color. FBS head football coach was the one significant position which showed an increase in the percentage of whites.

TIDES released Mild Progress Continues: Assessing Diversity among Campus and Conference Leaders for Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Schools in the 2012-­‐13 Academic Year. This is a study that examines the race and gender of conference commissioners and campus leaders, including college and university presidents, athletics directors and faculty athletics representatives for all 120 FBS institutions. The study also includes head football coaches, offensive and defensive coordinators, assistant coaches and student-­‐athletes for the football teams. Finally, the faculty as a whole is examined.

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Date of Release: November 13, 2012
The BCA Women's Basketball Report Card

In today’s environment, collegiate athletics has created an immense pressure on universities and athletic departments to find highly qualified coaches who can achieve wins on the court as well as positively shape the lives of young student-athletes. The hiring process for finding these coaches should be a fair and open process, contingent upon finding the person that best fits the needs and wants of the university.

The BCA released its inaugural Hiring Report Card for Women’s Basketball in 2008 to address the dramatic lack of people of color in head coaching positions. The publication of this year’s Women’s Basketball Hiring Report Card presents the opportunity to evaluate both the hiring processes and the progress made since the initial 2008 Report Card. The Report card examines the hiring process for vacant head coaching positions of women’s basketball teams among the 120 colleges and universities who play football in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS, formerly Division I-A).

As of November 1, 2012 there were 25 coaches of color coaching women’s basketball at FBS schools. Coaches of color represent 19.2 percent of coaches employed at FBS schools.

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Date of Release: November 8, 2012
The 2012 Racial and Gender Report Card: MLS

The grades for Major League Soccer (MLS) increased for both racial and gender hiring practices in the 2012 MLS Racial and Gender Report Card (MLS RGRC). The MLS RGRC was issued by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida.

MLS earned a B+/A-­‐ grade on its racial hiring practices in the 2012 MLS RGRC with 88.6 points, down from 90 points in the 2011 MLS RGRC. MLS’s grade for gender hiring practices rose significantly from a C+ to a B with 80.5 points up from 76 in 2011.

The MLS received its highest grades for racial diversity in the categories of players and league office employees, both receiving an A+ for the 2012 season. The only other position to receive an A was the team professional administration category. Assistant coaches and senior administration both earned a B+/A-­‐. The team top executive category, which includes chief executive officers and presidents, fell from a B in 2011 to a C+ in 2012. General managers and head coaches received grades of B-­‐ and C+ respectively. This was an improvement from the D received for general managers for the 2011 season. However, it was a decrease for head coaches which dropped from a B to a C+ for the 2012 season.

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Date of Release: September 13, 2012
The 2012 Racial and Gender Report Card: NFL

The National Football League achieved its third consecutive A grade on racial hiring practices and its first C+ on gender hiring practices in the 2012 NFL Racial and Gender Report Card, released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida (UCF). This gave the NFL a combined B grade.

The NFL achieved the highest grade for gender hiring practices and overall combined grade in the history of the league with scores of 74.5 percent and 82.3 percent respectively. The NFL’s score for race decreased slightly from 90.4 percent in 2011 to 90 percent in 2012.

Using data from the 2011 season, the Institute conducted an analysis of the demographics of players, managers and coaches. In addition the Report includes a racial and gender breakdown of top team management, senior administration, professional administration, physicians, head trainers and broadcasters. Coaches, general managers, presidents and owners were updated as of September 1, 2012.

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Date of Release: September 5, 2012
The 2012 Racial and Gender Report Card: WNBA

In the 2001, 2004, 2005, 2006‐07, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, and now 2012 Racial and Gender Report Cards, the WNBA has received at least A’s for their race, gender and combined grades. The WNBA has regularly been the industry leader for all professional sport when it comes to diversity.


In 2012, the WNBA received at least an A for gender in all categories except for general managers and vice presidents. The percentage of women employed as team senior and professional administrators at the team level increased by 19 percent and four percent, respectively.


The WNBA received at least an A for race in all categories except for senior administration where it received an A- and vice presidents where it received a B. The percentage of people of color increased in many positions within the league. Players, owners, assistant coaches, general managers, vice presidents, and professional administrators all increased. In team professional administration positions, people of color almost doubled increasing from 14 percent in 2011 to 27 percent in 2012.

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Date of Release: June 26, 2012
The 2012 Racial and Gender Report Card: NBA

The 2012 NBA Racial and Gender Report Card (RGRC) was released today and showed that the NBA continued its leading position in the sports industry with its commitment to and record for racial and gender hiring practices during the 2011-2012 NBA season.

The Report Card was released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida, which publishes the Racial and Gender Report Card to indicate areas of improvement, stagnation and regression in the racial and gender composition of professional and college sports personnel and to contribute to the improvement of integration in front office and college athletics department positions. Each year, the NBA has made progress in almost all categories examined for both race and gender.

The NBA received an A+ for racial hiring practices, an A- for gender hiring practices, and an A for an overall grade. The NBA achieved the highest grade for racial hiring practices and overall combined grade in the history of men’s professional sport with scores of 96.8 percent and 92.9 percent respectively.

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Date of Release:April 25, 2012
The 2012 Racial and Gender Report Card: MLB

The Racial and Gender Report Card annually asks, “Are we playing fair when it comes to sports? Does everyone, regardless of race or gender, have a chance at bat or to operate a team?”

Dr. Richard Lapchick, the primary author of the study and the director of The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES or the Institute) at the University of Central Florida (UCF) said, “Despite the decrease in the grade for gender, there was more good news for MLB. Commissioner Bud Selig recognized the need for diversity in baseball long ago and made tremendous strides for inclusion and diversity, as is exemplified by the high grades for both race and gender in the MLB central offices where the combined grade was an A. With Magic Johnson being part of the new ownership group for the Los Angeles Dodgers, MLB became the only one of the major sports leagues to have two teams owned by a person of color. However, there is always room for improvement, especially at the team level.”

“In celebrating this 65th anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier, it is vital that we focus on the dream he set forth for baseball. Jackie wanted to see a diverse mixture of people participating in the sport through all levels: on the field as coaches and players, as well as those in the front office. MLB has done an excellent job in continuing to increase the number of people of color in the League Office and for Managers and coaches. Women also do well in the League Office. Now the front office of the teams needs to step up more for their senior staff and for all professional positions,” explained Lapchick.

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Date of Release: March 21, 2012
Keeping Score When It Counts: Analyzing the Academic Performance of the 2012 NCAA Division I Women’s and Men’s Sweet 16 Teams

Lapchick commented that, “There is good news regarding academic success in general for both the men’s and women’s Sweet 16 teams. The GSR and the APR rates of the teams are overwhelmingly high however the women still do better than the men. The remaining bad news is that the persistent gap between the graduation rates of white and African-American student-athletes remains too large.”

Lapchick stated, “It is clear that elite women’s basketball teams are performing at higher levels in the classroom than the elite men’s teams. There are eight women’s Sweet 16 teams that had 100 percent graduation success rates, but no men’s teams with a 100 percent GSR. There are 12 women’s and three men’s teams with GSRs above 90 percent. In addition, 100 percent of the women’s teams graduated at least 60 percent of their basketball student-athletes compared to half of the men’s teams. There was even better news for both the women’s and men’s Sweet 16 teams when we examined the APR rates. There were 13 men’s teams (81 percent) and all 16 women’s teams (100 percent) with an APR of 950 or above, 12 men’s teams (75 percent) and 15 women’s teams (94 percent) with an APR of 960 or above, and 10 men’s teams (63 percent) and 10 women’s teams (63 percent) with an APR of 970 or above. The number of teams reaching each APR benchmark improved from 2011 to 2012 with the exception of the number of women’s teams whose APR was above 970, which fell from 13 in 2011 to 10 in 2012. These numbers are evidence of good academic results for many of the Sweet 16 men’s and women’s teams with their APR scores. We are seeing a trend in the number to teams achieving high levels of success on the court who are achieving a similar level of success in the classroom. While the men’s GSRs are lagging behind the women’s, the men’s APR numbers signal that those numbers may be on the rise and reflect well on the performance of current student-athletes.”

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Date of Release: March 14, 2012
Keeping Score When It Counts: Academic Progress/Graduation Success Rate Study of 2012 NCAA Division I Women’s and Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams

This study is a follow-up report for the men’s tournament study that was released on March 12, 2012. The study compares the academic performance of male and female basketball student-athletes and of African-American and white basketball student-athletes by examining the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) and the Academic Progress Rates (APR) for the tournament teams. The women graduated at a rate of 89 percent vs. 67 percent for the men and had only three teams in the field that had below a 925.

Lapchick stated, “The women’s teams always give us good news to report each year. It has been clear that student-athletes on women’s basketball teams graduate at a higher rate than student-athletes on men’s basketball teams. Additionally, the disparity gap between white and African-American student-athletes has always been significantly smaller on women’s teams compared to men’s teams. This year’s study reveals that there has been no change in the disparity between graduation rates of white and African-American women student-athletes which remains at eight percent compared to 28 percent for the men’s teams.”

There are 22 women’s teams that have a 100 percent graduation rate in the 2012 field. They include: Dayton, DePaul, Oklahoma, Duke, Kansas State, Tennessee, Vanderbilt, Creighton, Ohio State, Iowa State, Nebraska, Penn State, Georgetown, Florida, Kentucky, Notre Dame, Louisiana State, St. John’s, South Carolina, Iowa, Connecticut, Princeton. All but one team in the women’s field graduated more than 60 percent of their student-athletes.

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Date of Release: March 12, 2012
Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2012 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams

The study examines the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) and Academic Progress Rates (APR) for tournament teams as reported by the NCAA. This study also compares the graduation rate data of white and African-American male basketball student-athletes.

Richard Lapchick said, “There was some good news to report. There was a slight improvement in the graduation rates for 2012. The enormous gap between the graduation rates of white and African-American student-athletes narrowed by almost four percent. The number of teams below the APR cut score decreased.” The overall GSR for male basketball student-athletes saw a slight increase in 2012 to 67 percent from 66 percent in 2011. The GSR numbers for white male basketball student-athletes dropped from 91 percent in 2011 to 88 percent in 2012. The GSR for African-American male basketball student-athletes increased slightly from 59 percent in 2011 to 60 percent in 2012. In the 2012 men’s field, eight teams were below the 925 APR standard compared to 10 teams in the 2011 field.

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Date of Release: December 5, 2011
Keeping Score When It Counts: Assessing the 2011-12 Bowl-bound College Football Teams:Graduation Rates Improve; Racial Gap Persists

Overall academic progress continued while the substantial gap between white and African-American football student-athletes remains the same from last year for the 70 Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) schools (formerly known as Division I-A schools) playing in this year’s college football bowl games, according to a study released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida.

Richard Lapchick, director of TIDES and the primary author of the study, said, “The academic success of FBS football student-athletes continued to grow this year. The overall football student-athlete Graduation Success Rate (GSR) improved from 67 percent to 68 percent. This year, 97 percent of the schools (68 of the 70) had at least a 50 percent Graduation Success Rate for their football teams, a significant 6 percentage point increase from the 2010 study. In addition, 99 percent of the schools (69 of the 70) received a score higher than 925 on the NCAA’s Academic Progress Rate (APR), the same percentage as last year.”

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Date of Release: November 15, 2011
Building Positive Change: The Black Coaches and Administrators (BCA)
Hiring Report Card for NCAA FBS and FCS Football Head Coaching Positions (2010-11)

The Black Coaches and Administrators (BCA) have sought to promote equity and opportunity for student-athletes and sports professionals at all levels of athletics in both coaching and administration. Dr. Richard Lapchick and The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) Research team have again provided the principle research and data analysis for the 2011 BCA football hiring report card; as well as the previous 2010 report. The initial six reports were researched by Dr. Keith Harrison and the Paul Robeson Research Center beginning in 2004. These reports have maintained an objective process of evaluation designed to measure the annual hiring trend of NCAA Division I football. The combined efforts of Dr. Lapchick, Dr. Harrison and the BCA have resulted in a noticed and steady rise of opportunities in head football coaching positions for NCAA Division I coaches of color since the release of the initial report of 2004.

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Date of Release: November 8, 2011
Assessing Diversity among Campus and Conference Leaders for Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Schools in the 2011-12 Academic Year

While there has been some progress, the key leadership positions at Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) schools and conferences remain overwhelmingly white and male according to a new study released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida. This was in spite of the fact that 19 head coaches of color represent a record 15.8 percent of the head football coaches at the 120 FBS institutions (formerly Division I-A).


TIDES released Mild Progress Continues: Assessing Diversity among Campus and Conference Leaders for Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Schools in the 2011-12 Academic Year. This is a study that examines the race and gender of conference commissioners and campus leaders, including college and university presidents, athletics directors and faculty athletics representatives for all 120 FBS institutions. The study also includes head coaches, offensive and defensive coordinators, assistant coaches and student-athletes for the football teams. Finally, the faculty as a whole is examined.

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Date of Release: October 5, 2011
The 2011 Racial and Gender Report Card: MLS

Once again, Major League Soccer earned an A grade on its racial hiring practices in the 2011 MLS Racial and Gender Report Card (MLS RGRC), issued by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida. With 90 points, the MLS grade for race was the same as in the 2010 MLS RGRC. MLS’s grade for gender hiring practices slipped from 79 to 76 points, resulting in a C+ grade.

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Date of Release: September 15, 2011
The 2011 Racial and Gender Report Card: NFL

The National Football League achieved its second consecutive A grade on racial hiring practices and its second consecutive C on gender hiring practices in the 2011 NFL Racial and Gender Report Card, released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida (UCF). This gave the NFL a combined B grade.

The NFL’s score for race decreased slightly from 90.6 in the previous report to 90.4 points out of 100. The score for gender increased slightly from 69.5 to 69.6.

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Date of Release: August 10, 2011
The 2011 Racial and Gender Report Card: Women's National Basketball Association

The WNBA received a combined grade for race and gender of A by earning an A+ for race and an A for gender in the 2011 WNBA Racial and Gender Report Card. This was after receiving a combined A+ in the 2009 and 2010 Report Cards.

In the 2001, 2004, 2005, 2006‐07, 2008, 2009, 2010 and now the 2011 Racial and Gender Report Cards, the WNBA has received at least A’s for their race, gender and combined grades. The WNBA has consistently been the industry leader for all professional sport when it comes to diversity. The 94.7 points earned for race was the highest total for race in the history of the WNBA.

The Report Card asks, “Are we playing fair when it comes to sports? Does everyone, regardless of race or gender, have a chance to score a basket and run
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Date of Release: July 20, 2011
The Madison Avenue Project 2011: Super Bowl Ads

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida (UCF) has conducted its second annual study on the racial and gender makeup of creative directors responsible for the advertising spots aired during the Super Bowl. The report has been compiled at the request of the Madison Avenue Project, a partnership between the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and Mehri & Skalet, PLLC.

Not much changed between Super Bowl XLIV and XLV. According to the Nielsen Ratings, Super Bowl XLV between the Green Bay Packers and Pittsburgh Steelers drew the highest rating in American television history with an estimated 111 million viewers, surpassing the record 105 million viewers for Super Bowl XLIV, played in 2010. For the second consecutive year, the matchup pitted an inexperienced small market NFC team against an AFC team that had won a Super Bowl recently.
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Date of Release: June 16, 2011
The 2011 Racial and Gender Report Card: National Basketball Association

The NBA remains the industry leader on issues related to racial and gender hiring practices. As the 2011 Racial and Gender Report Card shows, the National Basketball Association had the best grade among the men’s leagues for race and gender as it has for two decades.

The NBA had an A+ for race and an A- for gender for a combined A..
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Date of Release: April 27, 2011
The 2010 Racial and Gender Report Card:Assosciated Press Sports Editors

The third bi-annual edition of the Associated Press Sports Editors Racial and Gender Report Card, covering more than 320 websites and newspapers (up from 281 APSE members a year ago), was released today. It measures changes from the 2008 data for the industry established in the previous report. The 2010 Report was published by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida and was requested by the Associated Press Sports Editors (APSE). This was the third time TIDES was asked by the organization to review the data of its own staff. For 2010, the APSE Web sites and newspapers improved with a grade of C+ for racial hiring practices, up from a C in 2008. However, they received a second consecutive F for gender hiring practices in the key positions covered. Grades were not issued for the 2006 Report Card.
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Date of Release: April 21, 2011
The 2011 Racial and Gender Report Card: Major League Baseball

Major League Baseball continues to demonstrate an outstanding record on the issue of racial and gender hiring practices. However, after steady improvement in both areas for several years, this year there were decreases in the percentages of people of color and women in several categories. Overall, baseball received an A for race and a B- for gender in the 2011 Report Card. The Racial and Gender Report Card annually asks, “Are we playing fair when it comes to sports? Does everyone, regardless of race or gender, have a chance at bat or to operate a team?”
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Date of Release: March 23, 2011
The 2011 Men and Women Sweet 16 Study

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida released a new study on the Graduation Success Rates and Academic Progress Rates of the teams in the men’s and women’s Sweet 16. It is a follow-up to its annual study, “Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2011 NCAA Division I Women’s and Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams,” which compared Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for Division I teams that had been selected for the men’s and women’s brackets of the 2011 NCAA Basketball Tournaments. The author of the study is Dr. Richard Lapchick, who is director of The Institute and chair of the DeVos Sport Business Management Graduate Program at UCF. The study was co-authored this year by Kara Adams, Simone Jackson, Michael Kuhn, and Elizabeth Schulz.
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Date of Release: March 15, 2011
The 2011 Division I Women vs. Men College Basketball Study

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida released its annual study, “Keeping Score When It Counts: Academic Progress/Graduation Success Rate Study of NCAA Division I Women’s and Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams,” which compares graduation rates for Division I teams that have been selected for the men’s and women’s brackets of the 2011 NCAA Basketball Tournaments. The study examines the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) and the Academic Progress Rates (APR) for the tournament teams. The author of the study is Dr. Richard Lapchick, who is director of The Institute and chair of the DeVos Sport Business Management Graduate Program at UCF. The study was co-authored this year by Kara Adams and Simone Jackson. The study compares the academic performance of male and female basketball student-athletes and of African-American and white basketball student-athletes. The study on the men’s tournament teams was released on March 14.

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Date of Release: March 14, 2011
The 2011 Division I Men's College Basketball Study

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida released its annual study, “Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2011 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams,” which is the most comprehensive analysis to date of the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament-bound teams. The study examines the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) and Academic Progress Rates (APR) for the tournament teams as reported by the NCAA. The study also compares the performance in the classroom for African-American and white basketball student-athletes. Dr. Richard Lapchick, the primary author of the study, is director of The Institute and Chair of the DeVos Sport Business Management Graduate Program at UCF. The study was co-authored this year by Michael Kuhn and Elizabeth Schulz.

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Date of Release: March 3, 2011
The 2010 Racial and Gender Report Card: College Sport

The 2010 College Racial and Gender Report Card, issued today by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida, showed that college sport increased its grade for racial hiring practices from a C+ to a B while maintaining a solid B for gender hiring practices. The combined grade was a solid B.

College sport received the B for racial hiring practices by earning 81.9 points, up from 76.2 points in the 2008 College RGRC, the last report where a grade was issued. College sport received the B for gender hiring practices by earning 82.3 points, up from 80.7 points in the 2008 College RGRC. The combined grade was raised from a C+ (78.5) to a B (82.1). The 2009 College RGRC did not include grades because there was insufficient new data to update the 2008 College RGRC.

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Date of Release: December 6, 2010
The 2009-2010 College Football Bowl Study

Overall academic progress continued while the gap between white and African-American football student-athletes increased slightly for the 70 Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) schools playing in this year's college football bowl games, according to a study released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida.

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Date of Release: November 11, 2010
The 2009-2010 Division I Campus Leadership Study

The key leadership positions at Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) schools and conferences remain overwhelmingly white and male, even though a record-high 15 head coaches of color led FBS teams at the start of the 2010 college football season, according to a new study released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida. The 15 head coaches of color represent 12.5 percent of the 120 FBS coaches.

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Date of Release: November 2, 2010
The 2010 Racial and Gender Report Card: MLS

Major League Soccer scored 90 points to earn another A grade on its racial hiring practices in the 2010 MLS Racial and Gender Report Card (MLS RGRC), issued by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida. The 90 points was down slightly from 92 in 2009 MLS RGRC. MLS maintained its grade of B- for gender hiring practices with 79 points, down from 81 in 2009.

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Date of Release: July 29, 2010
The 2010 Racial and Gender Report Card: NFL

The National Football League achieved an A grade on racial hiring practices and a C on gender hiring practices in the 2010 NFL Racial and Gender Report Card, released by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida. This gave the NFL a combined B grade. In the history of the NFL Racial and Gender Report Card, that is the best grade ever received on racial hiring practices by the NFL.

This was the NFL's first full A grade for racial hiring practices after the NFL's score for race improved slightly from 89.2 in the previous report to 90.6 points out of 100. This moved the 2009 A- grade to a full A. The score for gender decreased slightly from 71.5 to 69.5.

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Date of Release: July 29, 2010
The 2010 Racial and Gender Report Card: Women's National Basketball Association

The 2010 WNBA Racial and Gender Report Card received a combined grade for race and gender of an A+ by earning an A+ for gender and an A for race for the second consecutive Report Card. They tied their highest grade ever for gender with 97.5 points out of 100. The WNBA has earned the highest combined grade for any sport in the Racial and Gender Report Card since 2004.

The Report Card asks, “Are we playing fair when it comes to sports? Does everyone, regardless of race or gender, have a chance to score a basket and run the team?” Consistently, the answer for the WNBA is an emphatic “yes” with the best record in professional sport.

In the 2001, 2004, 2005, 2006‐07, 2008, 2009 and now the 2010 Racial and Gender Report Cards, the WNBA received A’s for their race, gender and combined grades.
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Date of Release: June 9, 2010
The 2010 Racial and Gender Report Card: National Basketball Association

The NBA continues to set the standard for the industry as the leader on issues related to race and gender hiring practices. As the 2010 Racial and Gender Report Card shows, the National Basketball Association had the best grade among the men’s leagues for race and gender as it has for two decades.

The NBA had an A for race, and an A‐ for gender for a combined A.
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Date of Release: May 5, 2010
The Madison Avenue Project: Super Bowl Ads

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida (UCF) has conducted a new study on the racial and gender make-up of creative directors responsible for the advertising spots aired during the 2010 Super Bowl at the request of the Madison Avenue Project, a partnership between the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and Mehri & Skalet, PLLC.

This report seeks to explain the current disparity in hiring practices that exists in the advertising industry regarding race and gender. The data, both quantitative and qualitative, yielded startling outcomes.
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Date of Release: April 29, 2010
The 2010 Racial and Gender Report Card: Major League Baseball

Major League Baseball had its best year ever with continued improvement of its record on the issue of racial and gender hiring practices. This remains especially true in the League's Central Offices and in the positions of manager and general manager where Commissioner Bud Selig has the most direct influence. Baseball received an A for race and a B for gender in the 2010 Report. In 2009, Baseball received its first ever A in race and a B for gender after receiving an A- for race and a C+ for gender in the 2008 Report Card.
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Date of Release: March 31, 2010
The 2009 Complete Racial and Gender Report Card

This is the 17th issue of the Racial and Gender Report Card (RGRC), which is the definitive assessment of hiring practices of women and people of color in most of the leading professional and amateur sports and sporting organizations in the United Sates. The report considers the composition – assessed by racial and gender makeup – of players, coaches and front office/athletic department employees in our country’s leading sports organizations, including the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), Major League Soccer (MLS) and Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA), as well as in collegiate athletics departments.
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Date of Release: March 24, 2010
The 2010 Men and Women Sweet 16 Study

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida released a new study on the Graduation Success Rates and Academic Progress Rates of the teams in the men’s and women’s Sweet 16. It is a follow‐up to its annual study, “Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Rates and Academic Progress Rates (APR) for 2010 NCAA Men’s and Women’s Division I Basketball Tournament Teams,” which compared graduation success and academic progress rates for Division I teams that had been selected for the men’s and women’s brackets of the 2010 NCAA Basketball Tournaments.
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Date of Release: March 16, 2010
The 2010 Division I Women vs. Men College Basketball Study

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida released its annual study, “Academic Progress/Graduation Success Rate Study of Division I NCAA Women’s and Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams,” which compare graduation rates for Division I teams that have been selected for the men’s and women’s brackets of the 2010 NCAA Basketball Tournaments. The study examines the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) and the Academic Progress Rates (APR) for the tournament teams. The study compares the academic performance of male and female basketball student‐athletes and of African‐American and white basketball student‐athletes.
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Date of Release: March 15, 2010
The 2010 Division I Men's College Basketball Study

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida released its annual study, “Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Rates for 2010 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament Teams” which is the most comprehensive analysis to date of the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament-bound teams. The study examines the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) and Academic Progress Rates (APR) for the tournament teams as reported by the NCAA. The study also compares the performance in the classroom for African-American and white basketball student-athletes.
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Date of Release: March 11, 2010
The 2009 Racial and Gender Report Card: College Sport

Every other year, the NCAA releases a new NCAA Race and Gender Demographics of NCAA Member Conferences Personnel Report and NCAA Race and Gender Demographics of NCAA Member Institutions Athletic Personnel. In previous years, these reports were used to examine the racial and gender demographics of NCAA head and assistant coaches, athletics directors across all divisions, associate and assistant athletics directors, senior woman administrators, academic advisors, compliance coordinators and managers for business development, fund‐raising, facilities, marketing, ticket sales and media relations and an array of assistants and support staff. This year represented the in‐between year in terms of the NCAA releasing racial and gender demographic data via these reports. Lacking these NCAA‐issued reports, The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports (TIDES) was unable to issue College Sport a new overall grade for 2009.

The 2008 Racial and Gender Report Card for College Sport showed that NCAA member institutions and their conferences lost ground for both their record for gender hiring practices and hiring practices by race. In fact, college sport had the lowest grade for racial hiring practices in 2008.
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Date of Release: December 7, 2009
The 2009-2010 College Football Bowl Study

Overall academic progress continued while the gap between white and African‐American football student‐athletes increased slightly for the 67* Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) schools (formerly known as Division I‐A schools) playing in this year’s college football bowl games according to a study released today by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida.

Richard Lapchick, the Director of TIDES and the primary author of the study noted that, “The academic success of big time college student‐athletes that grew continuously under the leadership of the late Dr. Myles Brand continued this year and will be part of his legacy. The new study shows additional progress and reinforces the success of Dr. Brand’s academic reform package. This year, 91 percent (61 of the 67 schools), the same as in the 2008‐09 report and up from 88 percent in the 2007‐08 report, had at least a 50 percent graduation rate for their football teams; approximately 90 percent of the teams received a score of more than 925 on the NCAA’s Academic Progress Rate (APR) versus 88 percent in the 2008‐09 report.”
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Date of Release: November 24, 2009
The 2008 Complete Racial and Gender Report Card

This is the 16th issue of the Racial and Gender Report Card (RGRC), which is the definitive assessment of hiring practices of women and people of color in most of the leading professional and amateur sports and sporting organizations in the United Sates. The report considers the composition – assessed by racial and gender makeup – of players, coaches and front office/athletic department employees in our country’s leading sports organizations, including the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), Major League Soccer (MLS) and Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA), as well as in collegiate athletics departments.
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Date of Release: November 17, 2009
The 2009-2010 Division I Campus Leadership Study

The key leadership positions at Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) schools and conferences remained overwhelmingly white and male even though there was a record number of nine head coaches of color in the 2009 college football season at the FBS schools (formerly Division IA) according to a new study released today by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida.

For 2009, there were seven African‐Americans (Turner Gill, University at Buffalo; Ron English, Eastern Michigan University; Kevin Sumlin, University of Houston; Randy Shannon, University of Miami (Florida), Mike Haywood, Miami University (Ohio); Mike Locksley, University of New Mexico; DeWayne Walker, New Mexico State University); a Latino (Mario Cristobal, Florida International University) and an Asian (Ken Niumatalolo, U.S. Naval Academy).
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Date of Release: October 20, 2009
The 2009 Racial and Gender Report Card: MLS

The 2009 Major League Soccer Racial and Gender Report Card resulted
in continued outstanding results for MLS regarding racial hiring practices and another significant improvement in gender hiring practices.

MLS earned a third consecutive solid A (92) for racial hiring after getting A’s in the categories of MLS League Office, players, head coaches, team president/CEO and team professional administration. Thiswas, again, the second best grade in men’s professional sport following the NBA for racial hiringpractices.
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Date of Release: September 24, 2009
The 2009 Racial and Gender Report Card: NFL

The National Football League achieved an A‐ grade on racial hiring practices and a C on gender hiring practices in the 2009 NFL Racial and Gender Report Card. This gave the NFL a combined B. In the history of the NFL Racial and Gender Report Card, those are the best grades ever received in each category for the NFL.

The NFL improved significantly from the previous report from a score for race of 87.1 to 89.2 points out of 100.
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Date of Release: July 23, 2009
The 2009 Racial and Gender Report Card: Women's National Basketball Association

The Report Card asks, “Are we playing fair when it comes to sports? Does everyone, regardless of race or gender, have a chance to score a basket and run the team?” Consistently, the answer for the WNBA is an emphatic “yes” with the best record in sport.

In the 2001, 2004, 2005 and 2006 Racial and Gender Report Cards, the WNBA had received A’s for their race, gender and combined grades. To this day, no other professional sports league has achieved that even once.

The WNBA remained as the best employer overall for women and people of color in sport.
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Date of Release: June 10, 2009
The 2009 Racial and Gender Report Card: National Basketball Association

The NBA remains the industry leader on issues related to race and gender
hiring practices according to the Racial and Gender Report Card for the National Basketball Association for the 2008‐09 season. The NBA has had the best grade among the men’s leagues for race for two decades.

The NBA had an A+ for race, and a B+/A‐ for gender for a combined A.
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Date of Release: April 22, 2009
Scoring the Hire: BCA Hiring Report Card for Women's College Basketball

The publication of this year’s Women’s Basketball Hiring Report Card presents the opportunity to both evaluate this year’s hiring processes and, for the first time, evaluate any progress made in the findings from the first to second year of the study. Among the several encouraging signs from this year’s report card, our evaluation indicates that universities appear more committed to conducting an inclusive interview and hiring process. More than half of the 16 available head coaching positions were filled by African-Americans and all but two universities received an ‘A’ grade in the final analysis.
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Date of Release: April 15, 2009
The 2009 Racial and Gender Report Card: Major League Baseball

Major League Baseball continued improving its record on the issue of racial and gender hiring practices. This is especially true in the League’s Central Offices and in the positions of manager and general manager where Commissioner Bud Selig has the most direct influence. Baseball received it first ever full A for race and a B for gender. MLB received an A‐ for race and a C+ for gender in the 2008 Report Card
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Date of Release: April 6, 2009
Improved Graduation Rates for African-American Student Athletes

The new study examined graduation cohorts of students who entered school between 1984 and 2001. The Institute looked at the NCAA’s Graduation Success Rates and the Federal Graduation Rates and compared them to the overall student body graduation rates of students in the federal graduation rates. Richard Lapchick, Director of TIDES, was the author of the study.


Lapchick commented, “I have been studying graduation rates for more than 20 years. The low rates for African‐American student‐athletes have always been my biggest concern. The improvement shown in this study is impressive. The increases in the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) for African‐American student‐athletes in the revenue sports were five percentage points in men’s basketball to 54 percent and women’s basketball to 76 percent, respectively, and four percentage points to 58 percent in Division I‐A football in the three years since the initial study. That is substantial and is very good news for college sport.”
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Date of Release: March 17, 2009
The 2009 Division I Women's College Basketball Study

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida released its annual study, “Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Rates for 2009 NCAA Women’s and Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament Teams,” which compares graduation success rates for Division I teams that have been selected for the women’s and men’s brackets of the 2009 NCAA Basketball Tournaments.
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Date of Release: March 16, 2009
The 2009 Division I Men's College Basketball Study

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida released its annual study, “Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Rates and Academic Progress Rates (APR) for 2009 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament Teams” which is the most comprehensive analysis to date of the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament‐bound teams. The study examines the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) and Academic Progress Rates (APR) for the tournament teams as reported by the NCAA. The study also compares the performance in the classroom for African‐American and white basketball student‐athletes.
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Date of Release: February 19, 2009
The 2008 Racial and Gender Report Card: College Sport

The 2008 Racial and Gender Report Card for College Sport showed that NCAA member institutions and their conferences lost ground for both their record for gender hiring practices and hiring practices by race. In fact, college sport had the lowest grade for racial hiring practices in 2008.
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Date of Release: December 8, 2008
The 2008-2009 College Football Bowl Study

Overall academic progress continued while the gap between white and African‐American football student‐athletes increased slightly for the 68 Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) schools (formerly known as Division I‐A schools) playing in this year’s college football bowl games according to a study released today by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida.
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Date of Release: November 6, 2008
The 2008-2009 Division I Campus Leadership Study

With the firing of Ty Willingham at the University of Washington and the resignation of Ron Prince at Kansas State, the 2008 regular season of college football will conclude with the controversy over the poor record of hiring African-American Division IA (Football Bowl Subdivision – FBS) head football coaches still continuing to make headlines. Their departure will leave only four African-American and two other head coaches of color. College football is still far behind other college and professional sports.
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Date of Release: September 24, 2008
The 2008 Racial and Gender Report Card: Major League Soccer

The 2008 Major League Soccer Racial and Gender Report Card resulted in continued
outstanding results for MLS regarding racial hiring practices and a huge improvement in gender hiring practices.
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Date of Release: March 27, 2008
Scoring the Hire: BCA Hiring Report Card for Women's College Basketball 2008

Title IX has been the driving force that has contributed to the exposure and success of
women’s sport on the collegiate level. The success of women’s sport has been an outstanding catalyst for the equality of women in modern day society as a whole. Females are finally getting the credit they deserve for their athletic prowess. Since Title IX in 1972, the number of women’s collegiate teams has increased exponentially but the number of women leading the teams as the coach has decreased dramatically. In 1972 nearly 90 percent of women’s collegiate teams were coached by women. According to the most recent College Sport Racial and Gender Report Card, only 41 percent of Division I women’s college teams are led by female head coaches. Specifically in basketball, 87 percent of the coaches were white and only nine percent were African-American women. That stands in stark contrast to the nearly 44 percent of the student athletes playing Division I women’s basketball who were African-American.
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Date of Release: October 24, 2007
The 2007-2008 Division I Campus Leadership Study

As the 2007 regular season of college football passes the halfway point, the controversy over having only six African-American Division IA head football coaches continues to make headlines. While this was an improvement over the five African-American head coaches during the 2006 season, it is still far behind other college and professional sports. At the end of the 2006 season, an African-American and a Latino (Randy Shannon and Mario Cristobal) were hired as head coaches at the University of Miami (Florida) and Florida International University respectively. In the case of FIU, it marked the first time that a school had a Latino president, athletics director and head football coach.
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